Hurm.

herochan:

Lil’ Hulk Adventures

Created by Charles Paul Wilson III

(via:thecomicartblog)

This is where – if you are the kind of person that thinks that books should be read with their authors in mind – it becomes relevant that JD Salinger saw more combat during World War II than almost any other American. The ‘Great American War Novels’ of that generation (Catch 22, Slaughterhouse-Five, The Naked and The Dead) were all written by men who saw far less of war’s horror than JD Salinger did. He was on Utah Beach on D-Day, at the Battle of the Bulge and he was one of the first Americans to enter a liberated concentration camp. And yet, Salinger returned home and wrote, not about war but, about Holden Caulfield bumming around New York City. So, you can say that the stakes aren’t high in this novel, but as Salinger well knew, the cruel and phony world of adults doesn’t just treat people like Holden Caulfield poorly, it kills them.

John Green, Crash Course (Literature)

(Relevant given the widening release of the documentary SALINGER)

sagansense:


Seeing Earth for the First Time
On October 24, 1946, a group of American military engineers and scientists did a very strange thing: they used a Nazi V2 rocket to take the first picture of the Earth from space. It was a strange but perhaps fitting time to find this kind of perspective—World War II was barely over, NASA did not yet exist, and Sputnik wouldn’t be launched for another 11 years. The only people who had seriously given thought to spaceships were the Nazis, who developed the V2 rocket bombs that wreaked havoc in London and Antwerp towards the end of WWII. When the Allies captured Nazi factory and launch sites, America seized some of these V2s and took some to the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, where they were launched into space for testing. Clyde Holliday, an engineer there, understood that images would be a powerful tool for space exploration, so he developed a 35mm camera that could take a photo every 1.5 seconds, and sent it up with a V2. Before this, the highest pictures ever taken were by the Explorer II, a balloon that reached 22 kilometres high in 1935, but Holliday’s V2 rocket climbed to an altitude over 100 kilometres. It snapped photos every 1.5 seconds, then fell back down and slammed into the Earth, destroying the camera—but luckily a steel cassette protected the film. The image seen above is the first image the camera took: the grainy grey Earth against the vast blackness of space. Later images stitched together in a panorama can be seen here. National Geographic released these photos in 1950, giving the world our first real glimpse of how small we are, and how high we can reach.

via sciencesoup

sagansense:

Seeing Earth for the First Time

On October 24, 1946, a group of American military engineers and scientists did a very strange thing: they used a Nazi V2 rocket to take the first picture of the Earth from space. It was a strange but perhaps fitting time to find this kind of perspective—World War II was barely over, NASA did not yet exist, and Sputnik wouldn’t be launched for another 11 years. The only people who had seriously given thought to spaceships were the Nazis, who developed the V2 rocket bombs that wreaked havoc in London and Antwerp towards the end of WWII. When the Allies captured Nazi factory and launch sites, America seized some of these V2s and took some to the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, where they were launched into space for testing. Clyde Holliday, an engineer there, understood that images would be a powerful tool for space exploration, so he developed a 35mm camera that could take a photo every 1.5 seconds, and sent it up with a V2. Before this, the highest pictures ever taken were by the Explorer II, a balloon that reached 22 kilometres high in 1935, but Holliday’s V2 rocket climbed to an altitude over 100 kilometres. It snapped photos every 1.5 seconds, then fell back down and slammed into the Earth, destroying the camera—but luckily a steel cassette protected the film. The image seen above is the first image the camera took: the grainy grey Earth against the vast blackness of space. Later images stitched together in a panorama can be seen here. National Geographic released these photos in 1950, giving the world our first real glimpse of how small we are, and how high we can reach.

via sciencesoup

 You know what the first thing of flying is, Little Albatross? Well of course you do. You can read my mind.  Love. You can know all the math in the ‘verse, you take a bird in the air you don’t love it’ll shake you just as sure as the worlds turn. Love keeps her in the air when she oughta fall down. Tells you she’s hurting ‘fore she keens. Makes her a home.

I dance inside my head and on the outside it looks I’m like another not-yet-dead human waiting for the inevitable affirmation that it was all worth exactly its weight, that the currency exchange between reality and meaning is 1:1, that no one makes a loss or a profit. Everything is just exactly everything, and that’s the worst part.
the-science-llama:

This edition of Ridiculous Headlines, scientists have re-discovered ice!
It gets better tho, this new form of liquid is called, wait for it… a liquid-liquid. Yo dawg, I heard you like liquids, so I go you some liquids for your liquids. Anyway… here is how you can do this yourself, it’s called supercooling. Now you can do magic SCIENCE at home!

the-science-llama:

This edition of Ridiculous Headlines, scientists have re-discovered ice!

It gets better tho, this new form of liquid is called, wait for it… a liquid-liquid. Yo dawg, I heard you like liquids, so I go you some liquids for your liquids. Anyway… here is how you can do this yourself, it’s called supercooling. Now you can do magic SCIENCE at home!

jtotheizzoe:

via visualizingmath:

Fractal Generator Art by Tom Beddard

All three of these fractals were created using a fractal generator. They were inspired by German biologist Ernst Haeckel’s famous biology book Artforms of Nature. In particular, these fractals were based on Haeckel’s artwork Astrophyton darwinium.

These fractals show that mathematics and biology can make a very stunning combination!

Haeckel yes.

If you’re new to the classic illustrations that inspired these, you’re in for a treat. Check the links above.

raises:

nature/vintage blog

jtotheizzoe:

Name That Dolphin!

Dolphins can recognize themselves in a mirror, they give themselves a signature whistle “name” just after birth, and we know that they imitate each other’s “whistle names” when looking for lost relatives.

That’s already very cool. But now this science has gotten even cooler.

New research on this special form of animal intelligence shows that dolphins who hear their own “name” called out respond with their personal whistle. It’s like one says “Hey, is Flipper here?" and then Flipper says "Yeah, I’m here!

The audio above, via NPR Science, demonstrates one of these signature “identity whistles” recorded by researcher Stephanie King. She and her team recorded them from individuals, modified them slightly, and then played them back to the original dolphin. The dolphins answered!

This opens the door to studying the extensive repertoire used by these intelligent mammals. They use a multitude of vocalizations that remain mysterious, but are now all the more intriguing. What are they “saying”?

Check out more at Wired.